A biography of robert bunsen a german chemist

The spectroscope served as a springboard by which five new elements were discovered. He had his full attention to scientific research and was loved by many.

Bunsen contributed to the foundations of photochemistry in collaboration with H. He found an antidote to arsenic poisoning in freshly precipitated hydrated ferric oxide Bunsen taught there for three years, and then accepted an associate professorship at the University of Marburg, where he continued his studies on cacodyl derivatives.

Bunsen was one of the founders of the field of spectroscopy. His pioneering studies of gas analysis laid the foundation of techniques still in use years later.

He tutored here for three years before being an associate professor at the University of Marburg. With the help of Peter Desaga, Bunsen originated the Bunsen burner.

As a matter of principle he never took out a patent. For a number of years he had been considering the problem, not only of lighting the laboratory room itself, but also developing a better heat source for lab work.

Also, there is a time that he almost lost his life due to arsenic poisoning. There he used electrolysis to produce pure metalssuch as chromiummagnesiumaluminummanganesesodiumbariumcalcium and lithium.

Robert Bunsen life and biography

Lockemann nevertheless regarded the 30th as the correct date. The hottest part of the Bunsen flame, which is found just above the tip of the primary flame, reaches about 1, C 2, F. Such studies opened the field of spectrum analysis, which became of great importance in the study of the Sun and stars and also led Bunsen almost immediately to his discovery of two alkali-group metalscesium and rubidium.

Thus the fledgling science of spectroscopy, which would develop into a vital tool for chemical analysis, was born. After coming up with the Bunsen cell inafter a decade, inRobert Bunsen joined the University of Breslau as a professor.

He was the first to obtain magnesium in the metallic state and study its physical and chemical properties, demonstrating the brilliance and reaction-producing actinic qualities of the flame when magnesium is burned in air.

Besides, he was also a professor teaching contemporary philology. Since each chemical element rendered radiant by the heat source emitted a characteristic pattern of lines spectrumthere had been developed the supreme instrument of chemical analysis.

In later years his scientific discoveries contributed to the increased efficiency of some of these basic industries. A useful by-product of this research was his discovery of the antidote for arsenic poisoning. Upon his return to Germany, Bunsen became a lecturer at Gottingen and began his experimental studies of the insolubility of metal salts of arsenious acid.

Part of these experiments featured the in solubility of metal salts. This earned him high acclaim because cacodyl was complicated to work with hence making him famous. The newer design of Bunsen and Desaga, which provided a very hot and clean flame, is now called simply the " Bunsen burner ", a common laboratory equipment.

The following year he discovered rubidium, by a similar process. There had been earlier studies of the characteristic colors of heated elements, but nothing systematic.

He investigated emission spectra of heated elements, and discovered caesium in and rubidium in with the physicist Gustav Kirchhoff. He conducted temperature studies on the water in the geyser tube at different depths and discovered that the water was indeed hot enough to boil.

He knew how to use it at the right time and in the right company; he even had a considerable degree of very sound egotism. He named the element "caesium", after the Latin word for deep blue. Never married, he lived for his students, with whom he was very popular, and his laboratory. Bunsen taught there for three years, and then accepted an associate professorship at the University of Marburgwhere he continued his studies on cacodyl derivatives.

Some even went so far as to claim the invention as their own, including one person who was granted a patent on the device. Indulging his lifelong interest in geology, Bunsen collected gases emitted from volcanic vents and performed extensive chemical analyses of volcanic rock. From this work, the reciprocity law of Bunsen and Roscoe originated.

Bunsen and Kirchhoff soon discovered two hitherto-unknown elements, cesium and rubidium. Leicester and Herbert S. As a condition of his coming, he insisted on a new laboratory building and he also wanted gas piping included. These included thallium Crookes,indium Reich and Richter,gallium Lecoq de Boisbaudran,scandium Nilson, and germanium Winkler, This was the use of iron oxide hydrate.

He guessed that these lines indicated the existence of an undiscovered chemical element.

Robert Wilhelm Bunsen Facts

InBunsen earned his Ph.Robert Wilhelm Bunsen facts: The German chemist and physicist Robert Wilhelm Bunsen () was one of the great experimental chemists and a pioneer of chemical spectroscopy.

Robert Bunsen was born on March 31,in the university town of Göttingen. Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen (30 March [N1] – 16 August ) was a German chemist. He investigated emission spectra of heated elements, and discovered caesium (in ) and rubidium (in ) with the physicist Gustav Kirchhoff.

Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen was born on March 30th, in He was a well-known German chemist. He was a well-known German chemist.

He is to be credited for researching emission spectra relating to heated elements. Robert Bunsen, German chemist and physicist, is known for his work in inorganic chemistry. In particular, his work emphasized the experimental nature of chemistry.

Bunsen invented or improved on the electrochemical battery (Bunsen battery), the spectroscope, the gas burner, and the photometer.

Robert Wilhelm Eberhard Bunsen (/ ˈ b ʌ n s ən /; German: ; 30 March – 16 August ) was a German chemist. He investigated emission spectra of heated elements, and discovered caesium (in ) and rubidium (in ) with the physicist Gustav Kirchhoff.

Robert Bunsen, in full Robert Wilhelm Bunsen, (born March 30,Göttingen, Westphalia [Germany]—died August 16,Heidelberg), German chemist who, with Gustav Kirchhoff, about observed that each element emits a light of characteristic wavelength.

Download
A biography of robert bunsen a german chemist
Rated 0/5 based on 82 review
(c)2018